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GM, Ford results likely to reflect chip shortage’s varying impacts on sector

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October 25, 2021

By Ben Klayman

DETROIT (Reuters) – General Motors Co and Ford Motor Co are likely to show investors both the positive and negative financial impacts of the global semiconductor chip shortage when the U.S. automakers report third-quarter results on Wednesday.

GM and Ford have had to bring some assembly lines to a halt for lack of semiconductors, and contend with rising costs for other parts and raw materials as well as shipping. Lost production and rising supply-chain costs put pressure on profit margins.

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However, GM and Ford have been able to offset that pressure thanks to strong demand for their lucrative full-size trucks and SUVs, which has allowed them to cut back on discounts and maintain strong profits.

Investors will be listening carefully to what GM and Ford’s respective CEOs, Mary Barra and Jim Farley, say about how long they can protect profits from the supply-chain storm.

Both GM and Ford have recently outlined strategies for generating more revenue from software-powered services, and argued their businesses deserve to be valued more like electric carmaker Tesla Inc.

But now and for the next several years, the Detroit automakers – like Tesla – will depend mainly on profit from selling hardware.

The chip shortage https://www.reuters.com/article/chips-shortage-explainer-int-idUSKBN2BN30J has hit sales hard as inventories on dealer lots dry up. U.S. new-vehicle sales in September dropped to a tepid annual rate of just over 12 million vehicles, and industry forecaster IHS Markit last month cut its 2022 global light vehicle production forecast by 8.5 million vehicles or 9.3%, citing the supply-chain disruptions.

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Last month, GM Chief Financial Officer Paul Jacobson cautioned the company’s third-quarter wholesale deliveries could be down by 200,000 vehicles because of chip shortages.

Meanwhile, the rise in the price of steel and other commodities has been unrelenting. And the disruptions in the global supply chain, whether congested ports or a shortage of materials like resin and magnesium, have continued to drive up operating costs and interrupt production schedules.

Recent warnings about supply-chain disruptions from such suppliers as Magna International, Continental, Autoliv, Aptiv Plc, Lear Corp and ABB Ltd suggest the worst of the fallout could still lie ahead.

Several auto executives, including GM President Mark Reuss, have said they see the chip situation stabilizing next year, albeit at lower-than-desired levels. However, some executives including like Daimler AG’s chief executive, Ola Kallenius, feel the impact could last well into 2023.

Wells Fargo said earlier this month it expected GM and Ford to guide investors to the lower end of their financial forecasts for the year when they report.

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(Reporting by Ben Klayman in Detroit; Editing by Matthew Lewis)

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Wood’s ARK fund fails to join broad market rally as lockdown stocks slip

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November 30, 2021

By David Randall

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The broad market relief rally on Monday left many so-called stay-at-home stocks behind, dealing another blow to Cathie Wood’s ARK Innovation fund.

The $18.6 billion ARK Innovation fund, which outperformed all other U.S.-based equity funds last year due to its outsized holdings of stocks that rallied during the economic lockdowns, dropped 0.5% in morning trading Monday, well behind the 1% gain in the S&P 500.

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The benchmark index dropped nearly 2.3% Friday on news a new coronavirus variant, now known as Omicron, had been identified in southern Africa, spurring new travel restrictions worldwide. Yet global equity markets made up some of that lost ground Monday on reports the new variant may produce mild symptoms.

Signs Omicron will not deal a severe blow to the economy are prompting investors to remain in cyclical stocks, said Phil Orlando, chief equity market strategist at Federated Hermes.

“This is not February of 2020 when the world is about to shut down. If anything we think the economy will continue to improve from here,” he said.

ARK Innovation’s declines were widespread Monday, with 8 out of the fund’s 10 largest holdings down for the day. Telemedicine company Teladoc Health Inc, the fund’s second-largest holding, fell 5.1%, while streaming company Roku Inc shed 2.6% and Zoom Video Communications Inc lost 3.2%.

For the year, ARK Innovation is down 14%, while the benchmark S&P 500 is up 23.4%. That underperformance places ARK Innovation among the worst-performing mid-cap growth funds for the year to date, according to Morningstar. It remains among the top-performing funds over the last 5 years.

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Ark did not respond to a request to comment for this story.

(Reporting by David Randall; Editing by Mark Porter)

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Oil prices rise on bets OPEC+ will hold off output hike

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November 30, 2021

By Sonali Paul

MELBOURNE (Reuters) – Oil prices climbed on Tuesday, extending a rebound from last week’s plunge on growing expectations major producers would pause plans to add crude supply in January amid uncertainty over the severity of the Omicron coronavirus variant.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures jumped 99 cents, or 1.4%, to $70.94 a barrel at 0105 GMT, adding to a 2.6% rise on Monday.

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Brent crude futures climbed 82 cents, or 1.1%, to $74.26 a barrel, after gaining 1% on Monday.

Oil plunged around 12% on Friday along with other markets on fears the heavily mutated Omicron would spark fresh lockdowns and dent global growth.

The World Health Organization said on Monday Omicron posed a very high risk of infection surges, and several countries stepped up travel curbs. It is still unclear how severe the new variant is and whether it can resist existing vaccines.

With the demand outlook under a cloud, expectations are growing that the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting countries, Russia and their allies, together called OPEC+, due to meet on Dec. 2 will put on hold plans to add 400,000 barrels per day (bpd) of supply in January.

“We think the group will lean towards pausing output hikes in light of the Omicron variant and the oil stockpile release by major oil consumers,” Commonwealth Bank commodities analyst Vivek Dhar said in a note.

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Pressure was already growing within OPEC+ to reconsider its supply plan after last week’s release of emergency crude reserves by the United States and other major oil-consuming nations to address soaring prices.

“Following the global strategic reserve releases and the announcement of dozens of countries restricting travel to and from South Africa and neighbouring nations, OPEC and its allies can easily justify an output halt or even a slight cut in production,” OANDA analyst Edward Moya said in a note.

Also weighing on the market is the prospect of a resumption of oil exports from Iran, following upbeat comments from diplomats as talks resumed on Monday between world powers and Iran on reviving a nuclear pact.

(Reporting by Sonali Paul. Editing by Gerry Doyle)

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Main IKEA retailer’s profits jump despite ‘unprecedented challenges’

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November 30, 2021

By Anna Ringstrom

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Ingka Group, the owner of most IKEA stores world-wide, reported on Tuesday a jump in annual profit on the back of record demand for home furnishing as people stay at home more due to the pandemic.

Despite more temporary store closures due to pandemic related restrictions than the year before, and product shortages due to the global supply chain crisis, operating profit in the 12 months through August was up 31% at 1.9 billion euros. Sales were up 6%, to above pre-pandemic levels, with online sales jumping to account for 30% of total sales, against 18% the year before.

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Compared to the pre-pandemic fiscal 2019, profit was still down, by 8%, due to high investment levels. Capital expenditure was up 52% on the year, at 3.2 billion euros, as Ingka accelerated investments in digitalisation, new inner-city store formats, existing stores, and distribution and delivery networks.

Chief Financial Officer Juvencio Maeztu told Reuters he expected sales to grow also in the current fiscal year, and profits to be at least as high as in the past year. Investment levels would probably remain at least as high as in the past year, he said.

“Our journey to create a better IKEA forges ahead in a world that faces unprecedented challenges. COVID-19 will continue to impact our business and the communities we are a part of,” the company said in a statement.

“The global supply and transport crisis will require a resilient, flexible response. Efforts across the value chain will continue to mitigate the challenges with product availability, inflation, prices of raw materials and transport that are expected to continue into FY22.”

Budget furniture brand IKEA operates through a franchise system, with Ingka the main franchisee to brand owner Inter IKEA with 392 stores including city stores, and 73 smaller store formats.

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Inter IKEA, which is in charge of design and supply, in the past year absorbed substantially higher costs for raw materials and transports, but has flagged it will raise prices to its retailers this year in the face of continued high supply related costs.

Ingka’s Maeztu said in the interview that he could not rule out that Ingka would also raise prices this year.

(Reporting by Anna Ringstrom; editing by Richard Pullin)

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